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Institution responsible for storing, preserving, describing, and providing access to historical records

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Archive: Institution responsible for storing, preserving, describing, and providing access to historical records
An archive is an accumulation of historical records – in any media – or the physical facility in which they are located. Archives contain primary source documents that have accumulated over the course of an individual or organization's lifetime, and are kept to show the function of that person or organization. Professional archivists and historians generally understand archives to be records that have been naturally and necessarily generated as a product of regular legal, commercial, administrative, or social activities. They have been metaphorically defined as "the secretions of an organism", and are distinguished from documents that have been consciously written or created to communicate a particular message to posterity.

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New study suggests Pluto started out with a liquid ocean [Video]

New study suggests Pluto started out with a liquid ocean

New research published in the journal Nature Geoscience suggests Pluto started out with a liquid ocean that has been slowly freezing over time.

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 01:09Published
Astronomers find youngest known magnetar [Video]

Astronomers find youngest known magnetar

Astronomers at NASA and the ESA have discovered a star in the constellation Sagittarius that is the youngest known magnetar ever recorded.

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 01:19Published
Scientists claim they can see how the brain express loneliness: report [Video]

Scientists claim they can see how the brain express loneliness: report

For story suggestions or custom animation requests, contact [email protected] Visit http://archive.nextanimationstudio.com to view News Direct's complete archive of 3D news animations.

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 00:56Published
Chinese vessels enter waters near the Senkaku Islands for a record 66th day in a row [Video]

Chinese vessels enter waters near the Senkaku Islands for a record 66th day in a row

Chinese government vessels were spotted in waters near the Japan-controlled Senkaku Islands for a record 66th consecutive day on June 18.

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 01:09Published
Why you should put the toilet lid down before flushing: study [Video]

Why you should put the toilet lid down before flushing: study

Researchers from Yangzhou University have shown that an uncovered toilet can eject infected aerosol droplets up to three feet, or one meter, in the air, according to a study published on June 16 in the..

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 01:09Published
CERN approves proposal for €21 billion successor to Large Hadron Collider [Video]

CERN approves proposal for €21 billion successor to Large Hadron Collider

On June 19, the CERN Council in Geneva Switzerland approved the construction of a new 100-kilometer circular supercollider called the Future Circular Collider.

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 00:54Published
Company wants to send tourists into the stratosphere using high-altitude balloon [Video]

Company wants to send tourists into the stratosphere using high-altitude balloon

A new company called Space Perspective wants to send tourists and research payloads up into the stratosphere in a pressurized capsule elevated by a large balloon.

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 01:02Published
Fossilised egg could be linked to ancient marine peptile [Video]

Fossilised egg could be linked to ancient marine peptile

New research published in the journal Nature suggests a 68-million-year-old fossil egg may have belonged to an ancient marine reptile called a mosasaur.

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 01:06Published
China finds heavy coronavirus contamination at Beijing food market [Video]

China finds heavy coronavirus contamination at Beijing food market

China has published the preliminary report on the Xinfadi market, a major food distributor that is linked to Beijing's latest surge in coronavirus cases.

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 00:58Published
Chinese warplanes enter Taiwanese airspace for fourth time in nine days [Video]

Chinese warplanes enter Taiwanese airspace for fourth time in nine days

Taiwan's air force on Wednesday warned off Chinese warplanes that approached the country in the fourth such intrusion in just nine days.

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 01:33Published
North Korea says it will send troops to the DMZ [Video]

North Korea says it will send troops to the DMZ

North Korea said on June 17 that it will deploy troops to the tourist resort of Mount Kumgang and the city of Kaesong on the border.

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 00:58Published
More than 600 new cases of coronavirus emerge at German slaughterhouse [Video]

More than 600 new cases of coronavirus emerge at German slaughterhouse

More than 600 people at a slaughterhouse located in Rheda-Wiedenbruck, Germany have tested positive for coronavirus.

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 00:49Published
North Korea destroys north-south joint liaison office: report [Video]

North Korea destroys north-south joint liaison office: report

North Korea blew up the joint liaison office in the border city of Kaesong used for bettering ties with South Korea after days of rising tensions on June 16.

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 01:18Published
COVID-19 may infect brain cells: study [Video]

COVID-19 may infect brain cells: study

A new study from Johns Hopkins University suggests the coronavirus may infect the brain and replicate in brain cells.

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 00:56Published
Astronomers say fast radio burst detected in the Milky Way produced by highly magnetized star [Video]

Astronomers say fast radio burst detected in the Milky Way produced by highly magnetized star

The first fast radio burst to be discovered in the Milky Way has been traced back to a magnetar known as SGR 1935+2154 located 32,616 light-years away from Earth, astronomers researching the phenomena..

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 01:34Published
Ancient crocodiles may have walked on two feet [Video]

Ancient crocodiles may have walked on two feet

Experts have found evidence which indicates that ancient crocodiles may have been bipedal.

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 01:03Published
Scientists have found anomalous structures around the Earth's core [Video]

Scientists have found anomalous structures around the Earth's core

Geophysicists from the University of Maryland analyzed seismic waves around the world and found large unusual structures near the Earth's core.

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 00:53Published
Beijing reports fresh coronavirus cluster centered on wholesale food market [Video]

Beijing reports fresh coronavirus cluster centered on wholesale food market

China has put Beijing on alert as a rash of 59 domestic COVID-19 cases was reported in the city as of Monday.

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 01:09Published

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From the Archives, 1969: Whitlam vows free universities

In 1969, the leader of the Labor opposition, Gough Whitlam, vowed free university education in Australia. The policy, costed at $11 million, was successfully introduced in 1974.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1984: 250,000 Australians march for nuclear disarmament

In 1984, over 250,000 demonstrated nation-wide for nuclear disarmament. The huge crowds also demanded an end to uranium mining and export from Australia.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1982: New star extends universe by 4500 million light years

In 1982, a quasar was discovered 20,000 million light years from Earth, making it the most distant object discovered, shattering the theory that the edge of the universe had been seen already.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1956: Woomera to be an international satellite tracking hub

In 1956, Woomera in South Australia was chosen as a key observation post for some of the world's first satellites launched into space.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1983: Charles and Diana's four-week visit to Australia

In 1983, Prince Charles, Princess Diana and baby Prince William, arrived in Alice Springs to begin a four-week tour of Australia
The Age - Published

From the Archive, 1996: Bob Brown set to win Senate seat for Greens

In 1996, Bob Brown, the environmental campaigner won a federal Senate seat. It was the culmination of years of work building the Australian Greens into a national party.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1959: Australia's population reaches 10 million

On March 10, 1959, Australia achieved a historic milestone when the population reached 10 million. However, as the country grew, so did questions about identity and nationhood.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1942: Japan bombs Darwin

On February 19, 1942, Japan launched two air raids against Darwin killing 236. It was the largest single attack ever mounted by a foreign power on Australia.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1954: Grim battle to establish Antarctic station

In 1954, an Australian Antarctic expedition battled bad weather and 100 m.p.h. blizzards to establish the Mawson Scientific Station on the Antarctic mainland.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1964: 85 missing after Melbourne-Voyager naval disaster

In 1964, hope was fading for the 85 men missing from H.M.A.S Voyager after it was struck by H.M.A.S Melbourne and sunk in a training drill of Jervis Bay.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1983: Franklin Dam protests turn ugly

In 1983, a HEC boat rammed protesters on the Gordon River and Bob Brown was attacked in Strahan as the dispute over the Franklin dam turned ugly.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1997: Yachtsman Tony Bullimore defies death

English sailor, Tony Bullimore, is rescued after surviving 89 1/2 hours entombed in his upturned yacht in the arctic Southern Ocean.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1959: First live TV link between Melbourne and Sydney

The successful test of a direct TV link between Melbourne and Sydney made simultaneous telecasts possible. It was first used to broadcast a Sydney Test match live in Melbourne.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1964: Speed record set on W.A. lake

Donald Campbell set a new world water speed record of 276.33 m.p.h. in his hydroplane, Bluebird, on Lake Dumbleyung, 160 miles south-east of Perth.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1966: American satellite base planned for Pine Gap

On this day in 1966, the Australian and US governments signed a treaty for establishing a "joint space research" facility at Pine Gap, a few kilometres southwest of Alice Springs.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1919: First flight from England to Australia

100 years ago today, Captain Ross Smith and his Australian crew set out for home in a Vickers-Vimy from Hounslow Heath Aerodrome, England.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1919: 'A wonderful hush'

100 years ago today, citizens of the Commonwealth marked the anniversary of the Armistice with a two-minute silence. What was the story being the tradition?
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1950: Police raid Communist offices across Australia

In 1950, Commonwealth police staged simultaneous raids on Communist offices across the country, seizing large stacks of documents, literature and books.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1986: A last case, then Murphy era ends

Justice Lionel Murphy was a controversial figure, both lauded for his contributions to the High Court and the subject of a Parliamentary Commission into his conduct.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 2006: F-111 strikers bomb heroin boat Pong Su

In 2006, the North Korean freighter used to smuggle 150kg of heroin into Australia was destroyed off the coast of Jervis Bay by four F-111 strike bombers.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1990: Telecom's Talking Clock upgrades for the future

In 1990, Telecom's Talking Clock, running since 1954 was superseded. The new, futuristic Talking Clock was voiced by the ABC's Richard Peach.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1992: Victoria, NSW border dispute ends after 141 years

In 1992, A 141-year-old dispute over where NSW stops and Victoria begins was finally settled when the border was officially pegged on the old Echuca wharf.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 2007: What drove Charlie Teo, the country's most controversial brain surgeon?

He's a hero to his patients and celebrated abroad for his groundbreaking techniques, but in Australia Dr Charlie Teo has been regarded with suspicion - even hostility - by many of his peers since his..
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1977: Victoria's "Life. Be In It" campaign goes national

In 1977, after two successful years of encouraging Victorians to get fit, it was announced that the "Life. Be In It" campaign would be adopted nationally.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 2001: The Tampa sends distress signals to Australia

In August 2001, a political crisis was sparked when Norwegian cargo ship MV Tampa was refused entry to Australian waters after rescuing asylum seekers from a distressed fishing boat.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1989: Thirteen die in 1000-metre balloon plunge

30 years ago, 13 people died in Alice Springs when their balloon plunged about 1,000 metres into desert scrub after clipping the wicker basket of another balloon flying above.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1959: We trial the new-style telephone dial

Sixty years ago, as Australians prepared to swap out their old-style, letter-and-number telephones for the new model, the Herald published this guide for those "at sixes and sevens".
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1971: Police foil extortion bid against Ansett Airlines

In 1971, a bomb threat against Ansett Airlines was foiled by police. The extortionists used The Age's personal section as a way of communicating with Ansett.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1969: Man is on the moon

In 1969, history was made when Neil Armstrong first stepped on the moon. The historic occasion was the culmination of a space race that had captivated the world.
The Age - Published

From the Archives, 1969: Tobacco firms face new controls

In 1969, Australia's health ministers met to discuss controls on cigarette packaging and advertising. Reports had shown unprecedented levels of smoking in children.
The Age - Published