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Singaporean firm's cultured seafood plans

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Singaporean firm's cultured seafood plans

Singaporean firm's cultured seafood plans

Singaporean-based company Shiok[f][g] Meats has plans to develop cultured meat from stem cells as a sustainable alternative to seafood, CleanTechnica reports.

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Singaporean firm's cultured seafood plans

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RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Singaporean-based company Shiok[h][i] Meats has plans to develop cultured meat from stem cells as a sustainable alternative to seafood, CleanTechnica reports.

The word "Shiok" means "fantastic and delicious" in the Malay language, according to Shiok Meats website.

Founders of the company Sandhya Sriram[j][k][l] and Ka Yi Ling are looking to replicate seafood such as shrimp, lobster and crab, according to their website.

However, the company is not actually looking to make seafood look like crustaceans from the sea.

In an interview with Clean Technica, the two said they are instead looking to produce cell-based seafood that would consist of minced meat.

The cell-based meat would consist of stem cells that are fed with a nutrient mix that would help the cells grow into meat tissues." The seafood meat can then be used inside dumplings or wantons.

The company estimates it would be able to produce cultured shrimp meat for around $5,000 a kilo, according to Clean Technica.

Shiok Meats plans to release its products over the next three to five years.

RUNDOWN SHOWS: 1.

Petri dish with stem cells and a plate of seafood 2.

Shrimp, lobster and crab 3.

Fish from the sea 4.

The process of producing cell-based seafood VOICEOVER (in English): "Singaporean-based company Shiok[m][n] Meats has plans to develop cultured meat from stem cells as a sustainable alternative to seafood." "Founders of the company Sandhya Sriram[o][p][q] and Ka Yi Ling are looking to replicate seafood such as shrimp, lobster and crab, according to their website." "However, the company is not actually looking to make seafood look like crustaceans from the sea." "In an interview with Clean Technica, the two said they are instead looking to produce cell-based seafood that would consist of minced meat." "The cell-based meat would consist of stem cells that are fed with a nutrient mix that would help the cells grow into meat tissues." "The seafood meat can then be used inside dumplings or wantons." SOURCES: Inhabitat, Clean Technica, Shiok Meats, Tech Crunch, Business Times, https://inhabitat.com/cell-based-meat-could-replicate-and-replace-shrimp-lobster-and-crab/ https://cleantechnica.com/2019/03/28/reinventing-seafood-shiok-meats-cell-based-shrimp/ https://cleantechnica.com/2019/04/08/why-grow-shrimp-an-interview-with-the-founders-of-shiok-meats/ https://shiokmeats.com/ https://techcrunch.com/2019/03/15/shiok-meats-takes-the-cultured-meat-revolution-to-the-seafood-aisle-with-plans-for-cultured-shrimp/ https://www.businesstimes.com.sg/brunch/from-cell-to-table-the-evolution-of-food *** For story suggestions please contact [email protected] For technical and editorial support, please contact: Asia: +61 2 93 73 1841 Europe: +44 20 7542 7599 Americas and Latam: +1 800 738 8377




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