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The meteor that killed all dinosaurs: Explained

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The meteor that killed all dinosaurs: Explained

The meteor that killed all dinosaurs: Explained

Fossils at an excavation site in North Dakota, called Tanis, show details of what happened moments after the deadly asteroid responsible for the extinction of dinosaurs hit Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula.

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The meteor that killed all dinosaurs: Explained

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RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Fossils at an excavation site in North Dakota, called Tanis, show details of what happened moments after the deadly asteroid responsible for the extinction of dinosaurs hit Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula.

According to a recent paper published in PNAS, paleontologists found fossils of fish, trees, terrestrial vertebrates, and marine creatures that had been flung to Tanis in the aftermath of the asteroid impact.

These reveal about an hour after the asteroid hit Earth, debris from the collision turned into particles of glass that rained down for roughly 20 minutes.

These particles are called tektites and were found inside the gills of fossilized fish and captured in amber from fossilized tree resin.

The deposits at Tanis are a result of magnitude 10 or 11 earthquakes caused by the asteroid crash that then triggered large waves, known as seiches, that sloshed water, sediments, and animals into areas now known as K-PG sites.

Researchers believe these tsunamis reached Tanis roughly 17 hours after impact.

K-PG sites are part of the K-PG boundary, which is a sedimentary layer that marks the end of the Cretaceous period and the beginning of the Tertiary period.

RUNDOWN SHOWS: 1.

Location of the excavation site 2.

Size of the crater left by the asteroid 3.

Asteroid impact eradicates 75 percent of life on Earth 4.

Types of fossils found in the excavation site 5.

Tektite rain 6.

Tektites found in fossils 7.KP-G boundary VOICEOVER (in English): "According to a recent paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, fossils at an excavation site in North Dakota, called Tanis, show details of what happened moments after the deadly asteroid responsible for the extinction of dinosaurs hit Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula." "According to National Geographic, the impact left a giant crater measuring 50 miles or roughly 80 kilometers wide, and 18 miles or roughly 30 kilometers deep.

The collision catapulted tons of molten lava, vaporized rock and asteroid dust at high speeds." "The fallout covered the entire planet and led to the extinction of 75 percent of life on Earth and the end of the Cretaceous period." "In the recent study, paleontologists found fossils of fish, trees, terrestrial vertebrates, and marine creatures that had been flung to Tanis in the aftermath of the asteroid impact." "These reveal that roughly an hour after the asteroid hit Earth, debris from the collision turned into particles of glass that rained down for roughly 20 minutes.

These particles are called tektites and were found inside the gills of fossilized fish and captured in amber from fossilized tree resin." "The deposits at Tanis are a result of magnitude 10 or 11 earthquakes caused by the asteroid crash that then triggered large waves, known as seiches, that sloshed water, sediments, and animals into areas now known as K-PG sites.

Researchers believe these tsunamis reached Tanis roughly 17 hours after impact." "K-PG sites are part of the K-PG boundary, which is a sedimentary layer that marks the end of the Cretaceous period and the beginning of the Tertiary period." SOURCES: National Geographic, BBC, The Weather Channel https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2019/03/fossils-found-from-day-dinosaurs-died-chicxulub-tanis-cretaceous-extinction/ https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47755275 https://weather.com/news/news/2019-03-31-fossils-detail-day-asteroid-wiped-out-dinosaurs *** For story suggestions please contact [email protected] For technical and editorial support, please contact: Asia: +61 2 93 73 1841 Europe: +44 20 7542 7599 Americas and Latam: +1 800 738 8377




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