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2 in 5 Americans have been tricked by 'Dr. Google' into believing they have a serious disease

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2 in 5 Americans have been tricked by 'Dr. Google' into believing they have a serious disease

2 in 5 Americans have been tricked by 'Dr. Google' into believing they have a serious disease

Two in five Americans have falsely convinced themselves they have a serious disease, after turning to "Dr. Google" - according to new research.

A survey of 2,000 Americans found that 43 percent have looked their symptoms up online and ended up believing they had a much more serious illness than in actuality.

Sixty-five percent of respondents have used the internet to self-diagnose themselves, but the results show typing your symptoms into the search bar might do more harm than good.

Instead of alleviating concerns, 74 percent of those who have self-diagnosed online say searching for their symptoms made them worry MORE about their health.

That may be due to the answers given by Dr. Google, as the internet's medical advice was found by respondents to be reliable less than 40 percent of the time.

Commissioned by LetsGetChecked and conducted by OnePoll, the survey found that searching the web isn't everyone's first choice for a diagnosis - when respondents feel ill, half (51 percent) say they turn first to a health care professional.

At the same time, a quarter of those surveyed (26 percent) don't have a primary care physician and six in 10 actively avoid visiting the doctor.

This avoidance is due in part to the cost of medical care (47 percent), doctor(s) not believing them when they talk about symptoms (37 percent) and not having time to go to an appointment (37 percent).

But the survey also found a variety of factors that would encourage respondents to see a professional - including having results explained in a way that makes sense (47 percent), less expensive care (46 percent) and if it better fit into their schedule (43 percent).

That's in addition to having the ability to choose which parts of their health they can test (41 percent) and taking tests in their own home (38 percent).

Robert Mordkin, Medical Director of LetsGetChecked said, "This survey shows us that a significant number of people are living with on-going, negative day-to-day symptoms that they either don't understand or misdiagnose.

Many of these symptoms can be associated with thyroid issues." Dr. Mordkin added, "While educating yourself can be a good thing, it is important to have objective testing.

One way to do this is with home health testing, which enables better convenience, flexibility and peace of mind.

LetsGetChecked hopes to alleviate the public struggle with diagnosis by including two types of thyroid tests as part of their offering." In advance of Thyroid Awareness Month, the survey looked to see how knowledgeable respondents were about the human body through a series of multiple choice questions.

Sixty-eight percent believed they were knowledgeable about the body - but that wasn't necessarily backed up by the results.

When asked where the thyroid was located, only 45 percent answered correctly (the base of the neck, along the windpipe).

The most popular incorrect answer?

Behind the ribs and underneath the heart, with 11 percent.

Twenty-two percent mistakenly believed the thyroid was part of the respiratory system, instead of the endocrine system (37 percent answered correctly).

The piece of information respondents were most likely to know about the thyroid was its function, but even then, less than half (46 percent) were aware that the thyroid produces and stores a variety of hormones.

Dr. Mordkin of LetsGetChecked concluded, "The fact that over half of U.S. adults turn to Google to learn more about their symptoms is unsettling.

The fact that it can take weeks or months to see a doctor highlights the need for better solutions to testing, managing and knowing your health.

At home health testing empowers people to test their health on their schedule and continuously receive clinical support, providing a more sound solution than relying on Dr. Google for all of the answers."

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2 in 5 Americans have been tricked by 'Dr. Google' into believing they have a serious disease

Two in five Americans have falsely convinced themselves they have a serious disease, after turning to "Dr. Google" - according to new research.

A survey of 2,000 Americans found that 43 percent have looked their symptoms up online and ended up believing they had a much more serious illness than in actuality.

Sixty-five percent of respondents have used the internet to self-diagnose themselves, but the results show typing your symptoms into the search bar might do more harm than good.

Instead of alleviating concerns, 74 percent of those who have self-diagnosed online say searching for their symptoms made them worry MORE about their health.

That may be due to the answers given by Dr. Google, as the internet's medical advice was found by respondents to be reliable less than 40 percent of the time.

Commissioned by LetsGetChecked and conducted by OnePoll, the survey found that searching the web isn't everyone's first choice for a diagnosis - when respondents feel ill, half (51 percent) say they turn first to a health care professional.

At the same time, a quarter of those surveyed (26 percent) don't have a primary care physician and six in 10 actively avoid visiting the doctor.

This avoidance is due in part to the cost of medical care (47 percent), doctor(s) not believing them when they talk about symptoms (37 percent) and not having time to go to an appointment (37 percent).

But the survey also found a variety of factors that would encourage respondents to see a professional - including having results explained in a way that makes sense (47 percent), less expensive care (46 percent) and if it better fit into their schedule (43 percent).

That's in addition to having the ability to choose which parts of their health they can test (41 percent) and taking tests in their own home (38 percent).

Robert Mordkin, Medical Director of LetsGetChecked said, "This survey shows us that a significant number of people are living with on-going, negative day-to-day symptoms that they either don't understand or misdiagnose.

Many of these symptoms can be associated with thyroid issues." Dr. Mordkin added, "While educating yourself can be a good thing, it is important to have objective testing.

One way to do this is with home health testing, which enables better convenience, flexibility and peace of mind.

LetsGetChecked hopes to alleviate the public struggle with diagnosis by including two types of thyroid tests as part of their offering." In advance of Thyroid Awareness Month, the survey looked to see how knowledgeable respondents were about the human body through a series of multiple choice questions.

Sixty-eight percent believed they were knowledgeable about the body - but that wasn't necessarily backed up by the results.

When asked where the thyroid was located, only 45 percent answered correctly (the base of the neck, along the windpipe).

The most popular incorrect answer?

Behind the ribs and underneath the heart, with 11 percent.

Twenty-two percent mistakenly believed the thyroid was part of the respiratory system, instead of the endocrine system (37 percent answered correctly).

The piece of information respondents were most likely to know about the thyroid was its function, but even then, less than half (46 percent) were aware that the thyroid produces and stores a variety of hormones.

Dr. Mordkin of LetsGetChecked concluded, "The fact that over half of U.S. adults turn to Google to learn more about their symptoms is unsettling.

The fact that it can take weeks or months to see a doctor highlights the need for better solutions to testing, managing and knowing your health.

At home health testing empowers people to test their health on their schedule and continuously receive clinical support, providing a more sound solution than relying on Dr. Google for all of the answers."



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