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The average American gives up on their New Year’s resolution by this date

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The average American gives up on their New Year’s resolution by this date

The average American gives up on their New Year’s resolution by this date

It's official.

Feb.

1 is the day we call it quits on our New Year's resolution, according to new research.

A new poll of 2,000 Americans found that it takes just 32 days for the average person to finally break their resolution(s).

Sixty-eight percent report giving up their resolutions even sooner than that.

In fact, only one in seven Americans never actually believe they'll see their resolution through in the first place.

The study conducted by OnePoll in conjunction with Crispy Green also discovered the "why" behind our failure to keep our resolutions.

The top reason our resolutions don't stick is a self-aware lack of discipline (52%), followed by busy schedules and lacking the proper time to see them through (43%).

Two in five also point to societal and peer pressure as a big reason their resolutions are cut short.

But there are ways people try to hold themselves accountable for sticking to their New Year New Me lifestyle change.

Forty-one percent of those studied actively tell others their plans in an effort to be more liable towards their goals while a further 37% enlist a friend to complete the goal(s) with them.

The average person studied would even shell out a staggering $15,748.19 just to have someone hold them accountable for their New Year's resolutions.

But it's not just grand resolutions that people fail on — it's the little things as well.

Nearly three in four say it's the little failures in life that add up to big disappointment and regret.

Half (50%) of those surveyed report eating healthy as a struggle they experience in their everyday lives.

Staying on budget (47%),saving for retirement (42%), sticking to an exercise routine (40%), and spending less money (36%), all tally as the biggest ways Americans struggle to meet their goals on a daily basis.

As a result, more than two-thirds (67%) of respondents attribute setting a resolution as having a positive impact on their lives and helping them change their lifestyle over time.

The survey also found that it only takes four things to go wrong in a day before it's officially deemed "Bad." "Since the top two reasons we don't stick to our resolutions are a lack of discipline and a busy schedule, choosing a healthier grab-n-go snack can be one simple way to stay on track … of course, if the snack satisfies without sacrificing taste, you might have to remind yourself that you didn't fall off the wagon" said a spokesperson for Crispy Green.

Setting and accomplishing goals is hard for Americans.

Sixty-seven percent ultimately worry about what others will think about their failures, with one in five saying they are ashamed to admit they've failed at a goal they set for themselves.

A Crispy Green spokesperson added: "We Americans are born to achieve; however, we need to give ourselves room to fail once in a while so that we can learn.

The real challenge is to remain positive and optimistic when we do suffer a "little fail" and try and remain focused on the big picture.

Remember, life is not a race….it's a journey.

Take each day one "Smart Life-bite" at a time."

It's official.

Feb.

1 is the day we call it quits on our New Year's resolution, according to new research.

A new poll of 2,000 Americans found that it takes just 32 days for the average person to finally break their resolution(s).

Sixty-eight percent report giving up their resolutions even sooner than that.

In fact, only one in seven Americans never actually believe they'll see their resolution through in the first place.

The study conducted by OnePoll in conjunction with Crispy Green also discovered the "why" behind our failure to keep our resolutions.

The top reason our resolutions don't stick is a self-aware lack of discipline (52%), followed by busy schedules and lacking the proper time to see them through (43%).

Two in five also point to societal and peer pressure as a big reason their resolutions are cut short.

But there are ways people try to hold themselves accountable for sticking to their New Year New Me lifestyle change.

Forty-one percent of those studied actively tell others their plans in an effort to be more liable towards their goals while a further 37% enlist a friend to complete the goal(s) with them.

The average person studied would even shell out a staggering $15,748.19 just to have someone hold them accountable for their New Year's resolutions.

But it's not just grand resolutions that people fail on — it's the little things as well.

Nearly three in four say it's the little failures in life that add up to big disappointment and regret.

Half (50%) of those surveyed report eating healthy as a struggle they experience in their everyday lives.

Staying on budget (47%),saving for retirement (42%), sticking to an exercise routine (40%), and spending less money (36%), all tally as the biggest ways Americans struggle to meet their goals on a daily basis.

As a result, more than two-thirds (67%) of respondents attribute setting a resolution as having a positive impact on their lives and helping them change their lifestyle over time.

The survey also found that it only takes four things to go wrong in a day before it's officially deemed "Bad." "Since the top two reasons we don't stick to our resolutions are a lack of discipline and a busy schedule, choosing a healthier grab-n-go snack can be one simple way to stay on track … of course, if the snack satisfies without sacrificing taste, you might have to remind yourself that you didn't fall off the wagon" said a spokesperson for Crispy Green.

Setting and accomplishing goals is hard for Americans.

Sixty-seven percent ultimately worry about what others will think about their failures, with one in five saying they are ashamed to admit they've failed at a goal they set for themselves.

A Crispy Green spokesperson added: "We Americans are born to achieve; however, we need to give ourselves room to fail once in a while so that we can learn.

The real challenge is to remain positive and optimistic when we do suffer a "little fail" and try and remain focused on the big picture.

Remember, life is not a race….it's a journey.

Take each day one "Smart Life-bite" at a time."




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