Global  

No phones, no leaks: Lagarde's stamp on ECB

Video Credit: Reuters Studio - Duration: 01:54s - Published
No phones, no leaks: Lagarde's stamp on ECB

No phones, no leaks: Lagarde's stamp on ECB

ECB insiders say new chief Christine Lagarde has a deal for bank policymakers: Cut out the open dissent and I'll listen to you more.

Julian Satterthwaite reports.

Christine Lagarde is putting her stamp on the ECB.

That's according to bank insiders contacted by Reuters.

They say she's demanded an end to leaks and public dissent by members of the body's governing council.

In return Lagarde has promised to listen more, and not make decisions before she's heard all views.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) ECB PRESIDENT, CHRISTINE LAGARDE, SAYING: "The Governing Council stands ready to adjust all of its instruments as appropriate." The pact was agreed at a German mountain castle.

Policymakers gathered at Schlosshotel Kronberg, west of Frankfurt, to thrash out some new ideas.

Insiders say the result is a big change from predecessor Mario Draghi.

Critics claim he could be a remote figure who didn't seek consensus.

Some say he looked at his phone while policymakers spoke in meetings.

Perhaps as a result, his September package of stimulus measures for the euro zone sparked open dissent.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) EUROPEAN CENTRAL BANK PRESIDENT MARIO DRAGHI, SAYING: "We expect them to run for as long as necessary." The new way may be working.

No details have leaked regarding a sweeping review of bank policy promised by Lagarde.

But her style may also be born of necessity.

With no previous central bank experience, Lagarde needs to lean more on policymakers.

Reuters sources say it may also help to win over ECB critics, such as Germany.

Work at the ECB now and you may end up chatting to the boss in the elevator.

But don't mistake Lagarde for any kind of soft touch - especially on timekeeping or getting to the point.

Turn up late, or waffle, and insiders say you'll be swiftly shut down.




You Might Like


💡 One News Page Knowledge: Other News Mentions

European Central Bank European Central Bank

Coronavirus downturn helps accelerate move to green economy, says the ECB's chief economist [Video]

Coronavirus downturn helps accelerate move to green economy, says the ECB's chief economist

"The fact we have this downturn does create some room for accelerating what needed to happen anyway: the green deal and digitisation," said the ECB's chief economist Philip Lane.View on euronews

Credit: euronews (in English)    Duration: 02:45Published

Frankfurt Frankfurt city in Hesse, Germany

Human ‘Spiderman’ Climbs 545-Foot Building WITHOUT Harness [Video]

Human ‘Spiderman’ Climbs 545-Foot Building WITHOUT Harness

Alain Robert, known as ‘Spiderman’, faces criminal charges after scaling one of Frankfurt's tallest buildings. The French urban climber climbed to the top of the 545-foot office building without a harness. He wore a silver suit and cowboy foots, his stunt taking just 30 minutes to complete. The building is in Germany's financial capital and home to rail operator Deutsche Bahn, they have filed a criminal complaint against him for trespassing. Report by Shoulderg. Like us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/itn and follow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/itn

Credit: ODN    Duration: 01:30Published
'French Spiderman' dons cowboy boots for new stunt [Video]

'French Spiderman' dons cowboy boots for new stunt

Dubbed the "French Spiderman", Alain Robert scaled a skyscraper in Frankfurt on Thursday without a harness and wearing cowboy boots.

Credit: Reuters Studio    Duration: 00:58Published
'French Spiderman' dons cowboy boots new stunt [Video]

'French Spiderman' dons cowboy boots new stunt

Dubbed the "French Spiderman", Alain Robert scaled a skyscraper in Frankfurt on Thursday without a harness and wearing cowboy boots.

Credit: Reuters Studio    Duration: 00:58Published
Depression risk detected by measuring heart rate changes: Study [Video]

Depression risk detected by measuring heart rate changes: Study

For the first time doctors have shown that measuring changes in 24-hour heart rate can reliably indicate whether or not someone is depressed. In practical terms, this may give clinicians an objective "early warning" of potential depression, as well as a rapid indication whether or not treatment is working, so opening the way to more rapid and responsive treatment. Presenting results of this pilot study at the ECNP virtual congress, lead researcher, Dr Carmen Schiweck (Goethe University, Frankfurt) said: "Put simply, our pilot study suggests that by just measuring your heart rate for 24 hours, we can tell with 90 per cent accuracy if a person is currently depressed or not". Scientists have known that heart rate is linked to depression, but until now they have been unable to understand exactly how one is related to the other. In part, this is because while heart rates can fluctuate quickly, depression both arrives and leaves over a longer period, with most treatments taking months to take effect. This makes it difficult to see whether or not changes in one's depressive state might be related to heart rate.

Credit: ANI    Duration: 01:10Published

Germany Germany Country in Central Europe

New lockdowns in France, Germany as cases surge [Video]

New lockdowns in France, Germany as cases surge

Germany announced plans to shut down large swathes of public life for a month on Wednesday while France prepared to tighten controls further as COVID surged across Europe and financial markets tumbled at the likely cost of a second lockdown. Gavino Garay reports.

Credit: Reuters Studio    Duration: 02:17Published

New lockdowns announced in Germany and France as COVID-19 cases surge in Europe

The coronavirus surge in Europe has wiped out months of progress, prompting France and Germany to reimpose lockdowns. Elizabeth Palmer has more on the measures..
CBS News

Germany imposes partial lockdown to control COVID's spread

German Chancellor Angela Merkel urged people to stay home in November so families and friends can meet again during the Christmas season.
CBS News

Covid-19 coronavirus: France, Germany, look to more limits to curb rebounding virus

The French Government announced a nationwide lockdown today and German officials agreed to impose a four-week partial restriction period as European governments..
New Zealand Herald
Germany to go into circuit-break lockdown [Video]

Germany to go into circuit-break lockdown

Germany will impose an emergency month-long lockdown that includes the closure of restaurants, gyms and theaters to reverse a spike in coronavirus cases that risks overwhelming hospitals, Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Wednesday. Olivia Chan reports.

Credit: Reuters Studio    Duration: 01:14Published

Related news from verified sources

No phones, no leaks: How Lagarde is making her mark on ECB

Gathered in a German mountain castle last November for an evening retreat that ended with a...
Reuters - Published


Tweets about this


Related videos from verified sources

No phones, no leaks: Lagarde's stamp on ECB [Video]

No phones, no leaks: Lagarde's stamp on ECB

ECB insiders say new chief Christine Lagarde has a deal for bank policymakers: Cut out the open dissent and I'll listen to you more. Julian Satterthwaite reports.

Credit: Rumble     Duration: 01:55Published