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The South Pole Is Warming Three Times Faster Than Average Global Rates

Video Credit: Veuer - Duration: 00:57s - Published
The South Pole Is Warming Three Times Faster Than Average Global Rates

The South Pole Is Warming Three Times Faster Than Average Global Rates

The South Pole may be considered the coldest point on Earth, but even the remote region isn’t safe from climate change.

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