Global  

Scientists discover protective Alzheimer's gene, develop rapid drug-testing platform

Video Credit: ANI - Duration: 01:25s - Published
Scientists discover protective Alzheimer's gene, develop rapid drug-testing platform

Scientists discover protective Alzheimer's gene, develop rapid drug-testing platform

In breakthrough research, a gene has been discovered that can naturally suppress the signs of Alzheimer's disease in human brain cells.

The scientists have also developed a new rapid drug-screening system for treatments that could potentially delay or prevent the disease.

The research led by the Queen Mary University of London was published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

The main challenge in testing Alzheimer's drugs in clinical trials is that participants need to have symptoms. But once people have symptoms, it is usually too late for treatments to have a significant effect, as many brain cells have already died.

The only current way to test potential preventative treatments is by identifying participants who are at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's and seeing if treatments prevent the onset of their disease.

This includes people with Down's syndrome (DS) who have around a 70 per cent chance of developing Alzheimer's during their lifetime.

This is because the extra chromosome 21 they carry includes the gene for amyloid precursor protein which causes early Alzheimer's when overdosed or mutated.

In the study, published in the Nature group journal Molecular Psychiatry, the researchers collected hair cells from people with DS and reprogrammed them to become stem cells, which were then directed to turn into brain cells in a dish.

In these brain-like cells, the researchers saw Alzheimer's-like pathology develop rapidly, including the hallmark trio of signs of Alzheimer's progression - amyloid plaque-like lesions, progressive neuronal death and abnormal accumulations of a protein called tau inside neurons.

0
shares
ShareTweetSavePostSend
 

💡 One News Page Knowledge: Other News Mentions

Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer's disease Progressive, neurodegenerative disease characterized by memory loss

Researchers Develop Promising Blood Test For Detecting Heartbreaking Illness [Video]

Researchers Develop Promising Blood Test For Detecting Heartbreaking Illness

Promising new research indicates a simple blood test to diagnose Alzheimer's disease may be on the horizon. According to CNN, researchers have developed a blood test to detect the tau protein, which is one of the hallmark signs of Alzheimer's. Their study found the test was as accurate as a spinal tap or a positron emission tomography (PET) scan, which are the current gold standards of diagnosis.

Credit: Wochit News    Duration: 00:34Published
New Blood Test Is 96% Accurate At Spotting Alzheimer's [Video]

New Blood Test Is 96% Accurate At Spotting Alzheimer's

A blood test intended to measure levels of a protein in the human body has an amazing secondary purpose. It is 96% accurate in identifying people with Alzheimer's disease instead of another forms of dementia. A study published Tuesday by JAMA Network Open found the results according to reports at UPI. That's just as accurate as positron emission tomography, or PET, scans and spinal taps. It is more precise than magnetic resonance imaging and other blood tests, the researchers said.

Credit: Wochit News    Duration: 00:36Published

Alzheimer's: 'Promising' blood test for early stage of disease

The test could spot the disease at the earliest stage before symptoms appear, studies suggest.
BBC News

Queen Mary University of London Queen Mary University of London Public research university in London, England


You Might Like

Related news from verified sources

Scientists discover protective Alzheimer's gene and develop rapid drug-testing platform

A gene has been discovered that can naturally suppress the signs of Alzheimer's Disease in human...
Science Daily - Published


Tweets about this