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Study: Super-Spreaders Are Contributing To 'Explosions' Of COVID-19 Transmission

Video Credit: Wochit News - Duration: 00:39s - Published
Study: Super-Spreaders Are Contributing To 'Explosions' Of COVID-19 Transmission

Study: Super-Spreaders Are Contributing To 'Explosions' Of COVID-19 Transmission

A new study highlights the astonishing role played by 'super-spreaders' in the novel coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic.

Super-spreading is a phenomenon in which certain individuals disproportionately infect a large number of people.

Several super-spreader events have been recorded across the country since the start of the pandemic.

According to UPI, roughly 20% of all COVID-19 infections in Georgia during the early stages of the outbreak were directly linked with 2% of the cases.


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