Global  

Popular delivery robot had to be rescued by young man after getting stuck

Video Credit: SWNS STUDIO - Duration: 00:13s - Published
Popular delivery robot had to be rescued by young man after getting stuck

Popular delivery robot had to be rescued by young man after getting stuck

A robot in distress needed rescuing by a valiant young passer-by - after the machine got stuck UPSIDE-DOWN on a grassy cycle path.The robot, part of the popular Starship delivery fleet in Milton Keynes, Bucks., ran into a bit of trouble mid-journey on Wednesday, and ended up tipped the wrong way up.It is not yet known how the robot took a tumble, or if human interference was to blame.But Jack Graves, 17, who was passing by with a friend, spotted the robot's plight - and quickly took action to turn the robot over back onto its wheels, and see it on its merry way.In a short video clip, guitar teacher Jack, from Milton Keynes, can be seen spotting the robot, and approaching it to turn it the right way up.Jack said: "The robots are quite important in Milton Keynes - they help a lot of people out."That one could have been carrying food for a person who really needed it."I just filmed it to show people that you can help them.

I think a lot of people think that alarms will go off on the robot if you try to touch them or help them - but that's not the case."And normally, when people see someone doing a good deed, it makes them more inclined to do a good deed themselves."Jack added he did not know how long the robot had been stuck for.And after he righted it, it sat still on the path for a few moments, before continuing on its journey.The robot, developed by technology company Starship, is part of a fleet of 100 autonomous delivery vehicles used to deliver groceries and takeaway food to residents of Milton Keynes.The electric robots can carry up to two full grocery bags of shopping, making them perfect for shoppers who just need to buy the basics, like milk or bread.The popular, electric-powered robots move at pedestrian speed, around six kilometers an hour, and can navigate easily around objects and people.They are also programmed to say 'thank you' if someone helps them.And seeing the robot tipped upside-down certainly bought out unexpected emotions among the residents of Milton Keynes.Ann Sweeney commented: "Oh no!

Poor baby."And Susan Hassett wrote: "I keep an eye out for them when they have to navigate the entrance to the building site opposite us, it's very rough ground, I worry about them getting stuck."And Anita Raichura added: "Well done boys.

I think the robots are fab and make me smile whenever I see them.

Really hope no one deliberately pushed it over."A spokesman for the robot inventors, Starship, said: "If people see a robot not moving, they shouldn't do anything because we're aware of where every single robot is to the nearest inch and it may just be having a rest. "However if on the rare occasion someone sees a robot swimming or in any other odd situation then feel free to email [email protected] with the details."

A robot in distress needed rescuing by a valiant young passer-by - after the machine got stuck UPSIDE-DOWN on a grassy cycle path.The robot, part of the popular Starship delivery fleet in Milton Keynes, Bucks., ran into a bit of trouble mid-journey on Wednesday, and ended up tipped the wrong way up.It is not yet known how the robot took a tumble, or if human interference was to blame.But Jack Graves, 17, who was passing by with a friend, spotted the robot's plight - and quickly took action to turn the robot over back onto its wheels, and see it on its merry way.In a short video clip, guitar teacher Jack, from Milton Keynes, can be seen spotting the robot, and approaching it to turn it the right way up.Jack said: "The robots are quite important in Milton Keynes - they help a lot of people out."That one could have been carrying food for a person who really needed it."I just filmed it to show people that you can help them.

I think a lot of people think that alarms will go off on the robot if you try to touch them or help them - but that's not the case."And normally, when people see someone doing a good deed, it makes them more inclined to do a good deed themselves."Jack added he did not know how long the robot had been stuck for.And after he righted it, it sat still on the path for a few moments, before continuing on its journey.The robot, developed by technology company Starship, is part of a fleet of 100 autonomous delivery vehicles used to deliver groceries and takeaway food to residents of Milton Keynes.The electric robots can carry up to two full grocery bags of shopping, making them perfect for shoppers who just need to buy the basics, like milk or bread.The popular, electric-powered robots move at pedestrian speed, around six kilometers an hour, and can navigate easily around objects and people.They are also programmed to say 'thank you' if someone helps them.And seeing the robot tipped upside-down certainly bought out unexpected emotions among the residents of Milton Keynes.Ann Sweeney commented: "Oh no!

Poor baby."And Susan Hassett wrote: "I keep an eye out for them when they have to navigate the entrance to the building site opposite us, it's very rough ground, I worry about them getting stuck."And Anita Raichura added: "Well done boys.

I think the robots are fab and make me smile whenever I see them.

Really hope no one deliberately pushed it over."A spokesman for the robot inventors, Starship, said: "If people see a robot not moving, they shouldn't do anything because we're aware of where every single robot is to the nearest inch and it may just be having a rest.

"However if on the rare occasion someone sees a robot swimming or in any other odd situation then feel free to email [email protected] with the details."




You Might Like


Tweets about this