Skip to main content
Global Edition
Wednesday, January 20, 2021

A baby with bones so brittle a sneeze can break her back stands up on her own two feet for the very first time

Credit: SWNS STUDIO
Duration: 00:39s 0 shares 1 views
A baby with bones so brittle a sneeze can break her back stands up on her own two feet for the very first time
A baby with bones so brittle a sneeze can break her back stands up on her own two feet for the very first time

This footage shows the magical moment a baby with bones so brittle a sneeze can break her back stands up on her own two feet for the very first time.Little Mya Honca was born with a rare incurable condition called brittle bone disease, which means she's "like a china doll" and could suffer a break at the slightest touch. Her parents Emma Honca, 38, and Louis, 34, have had to handle their little one with great care since she was born in order to prevent her from being injured. Mya, who is now 15 months, had to spend the first six months of her lying down and has faced a brutal battle to build up her muscles ever since.Doctors say one day the young tot should be able to walk a short distance but that she will likely need a wheelchair to get around. Incredible footage captured last month shows the brave baby reaching a major milestone - by standing up on her own two feet for the very first time. Emma says the moment was both "brilliant" and "terrifying" in equal measure, as even though Mya now has more independence, she is also at greater risk of injury.Emma said: "To see Mya stand on her own two feet for the first time was a really incredible moment. "She has been through a lot throughout her short life so far but has managed to smile and giggle the whole time, her attitude has been amazing. "We definitely see this as a major milestone and a cause of celebration, but at the same time the prospect of Mya being on her feet does terrify me. "The more independence she gains the higher the chance is of her hurting herself, which isn't really something we can avoid, it's part of her life unfortunately."Mental health nurse Emma and husband Louis, who cares for Mya and also works as an illustrator, live in Hull, East Yorks., with their other children, Josh, 13, and four-year-old Marcus.Emma was told there were problems with unborn Mya at a routine 20-week scan in January 2019, when Mya was found to have a fractured femur in the womb. The couple didn't know their daughter had brittle bone disease, technically called Osteogenesis Imperfecta, until she was born on May 13 weighing 5lbs 15oz.Emma said: "Doctors told us she could have one of many conditions, it was really difficult to know her life as a baby wasn't going to be like most others. "After she was born and we found out she has Osteogenesis Imperfecta she had to spend a week on the neonatal unit, which isn't the start in life we wanted for her."Mya had to remain lying down for the first six months of her life and spent the subsequent months gradually being sat more upright until she could sit. She learned to crawl and last month stood up for the first time.

She can hold her own weight for a few seconds before sitting back down, Emma says. She said: "I worry that she could slip and hurt herself at any moment. "She has no fear, which is a wonderful thing, but it does make me scared sometimes. "With that being said I don't want her to hold back and be fearful of the world, I want her to live the best possible life she can."Emma added: "At the moment she is such a happy little girl - she never stops smiling."Emma said her main reason for telling Mya's story and celebrating her success is to raise awareness about Osteogenesis Imperfecta, which affects one in 20,000. She added: "I hope people can see the happy life Mya is leading and see that Osteogenesis Imperfecta is no reason to stop someone living their life."Osteogenesis imperfecta is a group of genetic disorders that mainly affect the bones. The term "osteogenesis imperfecta" means imperfect bone formation. People with this condition have bones that break easily, often from mild trauma or even with no apparent cause.

This footage shows the magical moment a baby with bones so brittle a sneeze can break her back stands up on her own two feet for the very first time.Little Mya Honca was born with a rare incurable condition called brittle bone disease, which means she's "like a china doll" and could suffer a break at the slightest touch.

Her parents Emma Honca, 38, and Louis, 34, have had to handle their little one with great care since she was born in order to prevent her from being injured.

Mya, who is now 15 months, had to spend the first six months of her lying down and has faced a brutal battle to build up her muscles ever since.Doctors say one day the young tot should be able to walk a short distance but that she will likely need a wheelchair to get around.

Incredible footage captured last month shows the brave baby reaching a major milestone - by standing up on her own two feet for the very first time.

Emma says the moment was both "brilliant" and "terrifying" in equal measure, as even though Mya now has more independence, she is also at greater risk of injury.Emma said: "To see Mya stand on her own two feet for the first time was a really incredible moment.

"She has been through a lot throughout her short life so far but has managed to smile and giggle the whole time, her attitude has been amazing.

"We definitely see this as a major milestone and a cause of celebration, but at the same time the prospect of Mya being on her feet does terrify me.

"The more independence she gains the higher the chance is of her hurting herself, which isn't really something we can avoid, it's part of her life unfortunately."Mental health nurse Emma and husband Louis, who cares for Mya and also works as an illustrator, live in Hull, East Yorks., with their other children, Josh, 13, and four-year-old Marcus.Emma was told there were problems with unborn Mya at a routine 20-week scan in January 2019, when Mya was found to have a fractured femur in the womb.

The couple didn't know their daughter had brittle bone disease, technically called Osteogenesis Imperfecta, until she was born on May 13 weighing 5lbs 15oz.Emma said: "Doctors told us she could have one of many conditions, it was really difficult to know her life as a baby wasn't going to be like most others.

"After she was born and we found out she has Osteogenesis Imperfecta she had to spend a week on the neonatal unit, which isn't the start in life we wanted for her."Mya had to remain lying down for the first six months of her life and spent the subsequent months gradually being sat more upright until she could sit.

She learned to crawl and last month stood up for the first time.

She can hold her own weight for a few seconds before sitting back down, Emma says.

She said: "I worry that she could slip and hurt herself at any moment.

"She has no fear, which is a wonderful thing, but it does make me scared sometimes.

"With that being said I don't want her to hold back and be fearful of the world, I want her to live the best possible life she can."Emma added: "At the moment she is such a happy little girl - she never stops smiling."Emma said her main reason for telling Mya's story and celebrating her success is to raise awareness about Osteogenesis Imperfecta, which affects one in 20,000.

She added: "I hope people can see the happy life Mya is leading and see that Osteogenesis Imperfecta is no reason to stop someone living their life."Osteogenesis imperfecta is a group of genetic disorders that mainly affect the bones.

The term "osteogenesis imperfecta" means imperfect bone formation.

People with this condition have bones that break easily, often from mild trauma or even with no apparent cause.

Advertisement

Related news coverage

You might like

More coverage