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Wednesday, January 20, 2021

A P.T smashes WR for most chin-ups in 24 hours in memory of late brother - managing a whopping 5,340

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A P.T smashes WR for most chin-ups in 24 hours in memory of late brother - managing a whopping 5,340
A P.T smashes WR for most chin-ups in 24 hours in memory of late brother - managing a whopping 5,340

A super-fit personal trainer has smashed the world record for most chin-ups done in 24 hours - managing a whopping 5,340.Idai Makaya, 46, took on the "intense" endurance challenge last week, hoisting himself up on the pull-up bar continuously throughout the day on Friday, and overnight into Saturday.The personal trainer, who owns fitness centre Bodystreet, in Milton Keynes, Bucks., survived the challenge by snacking on mini sausage rolls and biscuits throughout the 24-hour period.And he said he was "completely overcome with emotion" when he reached the previous record of 5,094 chin-ups, with an hour and a half to go - and then went on to add an extra 246 to the benchmark.Idai, from Milton Keynes, took on the challenge in memory of his late brother Garai Makaya, who died in a skydiving accident in 2017.Idai said: "It was mentally and physically exhausting."Chin-ups are intense.

The patience required to stand in one spot for 24 hours and keep going was brutal."I tried not to think about how long I had ahead of me - it is better to just live in the moment, otherwise it is like watching paint dry and being tortured at the same time."This challenge was a gamble for me - but thank God it worked out exactly to plan."Idai has also previously broken a record in 2016 for the fastest time cycling across Britain, from Land's End in Cornwall to John o' Groats in the north of Scotland - managing the journey in five days.And in 2018, he set a new record for completing the journey twice - from Land's End to John o' Groats and back again - in an impressive 11 days.But he said: "I am predominantly a cyclist.

Anybody who knows me knows that cycling is my sport."So when I was choosing this chin-up challenge, I wanted to find something that people would know I had never done before."The chin-up record has been around for decades, and has slowly been creeping up and up - and I have always been fascinated by it."After my brother passed away, I thought to myself, 'You are fascinated by this record, why are you not trying to do this yourself?'."Idai says he trained for around 18 months to prepare himself for taking on the challenge.But he said: "Most of my training was just general fitness training.

I only did pull-ups or chin-ups about twice a week over the 18-month period."And when it came to the world record attempt itself, Idai said he faced the challenge by doing short bursts of between five and ten chin-ups - then giving himself short breaks of a maximum 28 seconds.He said: "You physically cannot keep hanging on a bar for 24 hours non-stop. "You need to do short, rapid bursts, and then come off to let your body recuperate and get the blood back in to your hands."He said he got through the first couple of hours by listening to music, and then switched to listening to an audiobook about the 1953 Everest expedition.And in terms of eating and drinking, Idai said: "For the first 14 hours or so, I was nibbling on sausage rolls every five to ten minutes."Then after that, I got sick of sausage rolls, so I switched to biscuits for the last ten hours."I was having big gulps of water after about every hour."The fitness guru said he hit a mental 'wall' after around 4,000 chin-ups.He said: "Mentally, when I reached 4,000, I just wanted to give up.

At that point it was just mentally destroying, and seemed very intimidating."At about 20 hours in, I started to get blisters on my hands, and holding the bar was like shooting pain through my hands, like a knife.

I had to wrap my hands in duct tape."Also, because I had been so nervous in the week leading up to it, I hadn't slept very well, so I was very sleepy through the whole thing."But luckily, my body was okay."And Idai said when he hit the world record target and 22 hours and 30 minutes in, he felt rejuvenated - and like he had only just started all over again.He said: "When I got one chin-up past the world record of 5,094, I had to stop and go and have a little cry for a few minutes."I was completely overcome with emotion.

It was such a great feeling."After that, the rest of it was quite fun.

There was no pain anymore."I decided I'd try and get to 5,300 - but then when I got there, we realised there was only about five minutes left, so I pushed myself for the last few."Idai said that he feels relieved to have completed the challenge - and to have also broken the £10,000 mark on the fundraising page set up in memory of his brother, Garai.Garai passed away in 2017 in a skydiving accident - on the same day that he had qualified to be a skydiving instructor.He and some colleagues had gone up to do a celebratory jump - but Garai's parachute did not deploy properly due to a "series of human errors".He suffered a head injury when he hit the ground, and was dead within minutes, Idai said.Idai, who has started a charitable foundation in memory of his brother, said: "This is my way of making something positive out of a tragedy for our family."He said he has not yet come up with his next fundraising idea for Garai - but joked that he will not be trying anything else that involves chin-ups.

A super-fit personal trainer has smashed the world record for most chin-ups done in 24 hours - managing a whopping 5,340.Idai Makaya, 46, took on the "intense" endurance challenge last week, hoisting himself up on the pull-up bar continuously throughout the day on Friday, and overnight into Saturday.The personal trainer, who owns fitness centre Bodystreet, in Milton Keynes, Bucks., survived the challenge by snacking on mini sausage rolls and biscuits throughout the 24-hour period.And he said he was "completely overcome with emotion" when he reached the previous record of 5,094 chin-ups, with an hour and a half to go - and then went on to add an extra 246 to the benchmark.Idai, from Milton Keynes, took on the challenge in memory of his late brother Garai Makaya, who died in a skydiving accident in 2017.Idai said: "It was mentally and physically exhausting."Chin-ups are intense.

The patience required to stand in one spot for 24 hours and keep going was brutal."I tried not to think about how long I had ahead of me - it is better to just live in the moment, otherwise it is like watching paint dry and being tortured at the same time."This challenge was a gamble for me - but thank God it worked out exactly to plan."Idai has also previously broken a record in 2016 for the fastest time cycling across Britain, from Land's End in Cornwall to John o' Groats in the north of Scotland - managing the journey in five days.And in 2018, he set a new record for completing the journey twice - from Land's End to John o' Groats and back again - in an impressive 11 days.But he said: "I am predominantly a cyclist.

Anybody who knows me knows that cycling is my sport."So when I was choosing this chin-up challenge, I wanted to find something that people would know I had never done before."The chin-up record has been around for decades, and has slowly been creeping up and up - and I have always been fascinated by it."After my brother passed away, I thought to myself, 'You are fascinated by this record, why are you not trying to do this yourself?'."Idai says he trained for around 18 months to prepare himself for taking on the challenge.But he said: "Most of my training was just general fitness training.

I only did pull-ups or chin-ups about twice a week over the 18-month period."And when it came to the world record attempt itself, Idai said he faced the challenge by doing short bursts of between five and ten chin-ups - then giving himself short breaks of a maximum 28 seconds.He said: "You physically cannot keep hanging on a bar for 24 hours non-stop.

"You need to do short, rapid bursts, and then come off to let your body recuperate and get the blood back in to your hands."He said he got through the first couple of hours by listening to music, and then switched to listening to an audiobook about the 1953 Everest expedition.And in terms of eating and drinking, Idai said: "For the first 14 hours or so, I was nibbling on sausage rolls every five to ten minutes."Then after that, I got sick of sausage rolls, so I switched to biscuits for the last ten hours."I was having big gulps of water after about every hour."The fitness guru said he hit a mental 'wall' after around 4,000 chin-ups.He said: "Mentally, when I reached 4,000, I just wanted to give up.

At that point it was just mentally destroying, and seemed very intimidating."At about 20 hours in, I started to get blisters on my hands, and holding the bar was like shooting pain through my hands, like a knife.

I had to wrap my hands in duct tape."Also, because I had been so nervous in the week leading up to it, I hadn't slept very well, so I was very sleepy through the whole thing."But luckily, my body was okay."And Idai said when he hit the world record target and 22 hours and 30 minutes in, he felt rejuvenated - and like he had only just started all over again.He said: "When I got one chin-up past the world record of 5,094, I had to stop and go and have a little cry for a few minutes."I was completely overcome with emotion.

It was such a great feeling."After that, the rest of it was quite fun.

There was no pain anymore."I decided I'd try and get to 5,300 - but then when I got there, we realised there was only about five minutes left, so I pushed myself for the last few."Idai said that he feels relieved to have completed the challenge - and to have also broken the £10,000 mark on the fundraising page set up in memory of his brother, Garai.Garai passed away in 2017 in a skydiving accident - on the same day that he had qualified to be a skydiving instructor.He and some colleagues had gone up to do a celebratory jump - but Garai's parachute did not deploy properly due to a "series of human errors".He suffered a head injury when he hit the ground, and was dead within minutes, Idai said.Idai, who has started a charitable foundation in memory of his brother, said: "This is my way of making something positive out of a tragedy for our family."He said he has not yet come up with his next fundraising idea for Garai - but joked that he will not be trying anything else that involves chin-ups.

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