Lost Antarctic Shipwreck Found After 107 Years
Lost Antarctic Shipwreck Found After 107 Years

Lost Antarctic Shipwreck, Found After 107 Years.

After 107 years, explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton's ship, The Endurance, has finally been found.

After 107 years, explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton's ship, The Endurance, has finally been found.

'Newsweek' reports that the ship was found 10,000 feet below the surface of the Weddell Sea.

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In 1914, Shackleton's ship became stuck in thick ice just two days into an Antarctic excursion.

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Shackleton famously saved his 27-man crew by ordering them to abandon ship.

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The stranded crew fought for survival and all returned alive.

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A video of the wreck revealed that most of the ship's timbers have held together, and the name is still clearly visible in gold letters on the stern.

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A video of the wreck revealed that most of the ship's timbers have held together, and the name is still clearly visible in gold letters on the stern.

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The expedition was put together by the Falklands Maritime Heritage Trust.

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The South African icebreaker, Agulhas II, navigated ten days of icy water and treacherous terrain to reach the search site.

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Polar geographer John Shears is leading the crew as it remains on location to study and document the wreck.

Polar geographer John Shears is leading the crew as it remains on location to study and document the wreck.

According to 'Newsweek,' the wreck will remain where it has rested for over a century, and all artifacts will stay in place.

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Because Endurance is a designated monument under the international Antarctic Treaty, no physical artifacts may be removed, Ann Coats, British maritime historian and senior lecturer at the University of Portsmouth, via 'Newsweek'.

Because Endurance is a designated monument under the international Antarctic Treaty, no physical artifacts may be removed, Ann Coats, British maritime historian and senior lecturer at the University of Portsmouth, via 'Newsweek'.

However, Shackleton's heroic 800-mile voyage in the 22-foot Caird across the stormy seas to South Georgia to save his crew provides the drama here, Ann Coats, British maritime historian and senior lecturer at the University of Portsmouth, via 'Newsweek'.

However, Shackleton's heroic 800-mile voyage in the 22-foot Caird across the stormy seas to South Georgia to save his crew provides the drama here, Ann Coats, British maritime historian and senior lecturer at the University of Portsmouth, via 'Newsweek'