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Thursday, January 21, 2021

Models turn to photographer who is offering socially distant services

Credit: SWNS STUDIO
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Models turn to photographer who is offering socially distant services
Models turn to photographer who is offering socially distant services

Professional models who need photoshoots while under lockdown are turning to a New York photographer who is offering socially distant services. Pro-photographer Aaron Pegg saw his work dry up when New York City imposed strict stay-at-home orders in March - but his clients still wanted their photos taken. So Pegg, who is known for shooting inside the NYC subway system, decided to style and choreograph the models remotely, then take screenshots of the results. "I've done about six of these quarantine photoshoots so far and they've worked out really well," said Pegg, 34, of Brooklyn. "They're really fun actually, you have to give very specific directions and get creative with what the models have in her homes. "During this time people can start feeling a bit like their home is a prison but we transform their homes into a place of beauty, like a real photo shoot. "It helps to reset the energy of their home for them while they're cooped up. "You have to be really good at communicating with the subject, it takes a lot of direction. "For one of the quarantine shoots we put the phone on the model's ceiling fan to get some great aerial shots. "The model just needs a good phone or a camera and good internet service for it to work properly.

The rest is all styling, lighting and composition."  Pegg starts by creating a concept, then he guides the models through what fashion, hair styling and make-up they will need. "I'm basically the creative director - we plan everything from the lighting and background to the earrings.  "They walk me through their home, roof etc and I figure out the best places to take the pictures while keeping them safe and socially distant. "The models are serious about it, they make sure they have all the right clothing, jewelry, props and equipment to create the shoot. "Then, as I normally would, I tell them how to pose to get the best shots. "The composition is the most difficult, if they don't have a tripod or any photography equipment, which they usually don't, then we have to get creative with whatever they have around the house, plants and step ladders and stuff.  "I had one model put her phone on a cup to get the height and angle I wanted." While the shoots may be creative the photo quality of the screenshots is inferior to images taken with a professional camera. "I've been charging lot less for these quarantine shoots because these images wouldn't work for a portfolio, but they are totally fine for social media," said Pegg."I'm just trying to stay creative, creative people can get depressed around this time, because they have a lot of idle time. "These shoots give me the feeling of creating and accomplishing something, despite being on lockdown. "It's cool when people message me to say they've been inspired by my shoots and I've been getting offers for new bookings too. "It's a really different way of doing things but my clients have been really happy with the results so far." 

Professional models who need photoshoots while under lockdown are turning to a New York photographer who is offering socially distant services.

Pro-photographer Aaron Pegg saw his work dry up when New York City imposed strict stay-at-home orders in March - but his clients still wanted their photos taken.

So Pegg, who is known for shooting inside the NYC subway system, decided to style and choreograph the models remotely, then take screenshots of the results.

"I've done about six of these quarantine photoshoots so far and they've worked out really well," said Pegg, 34, of Brooklyn.

"They're really fun actually, you have to give very specific directions and get creative with what the models have in her homes.

"During this time people can start feeling a bit like their home is a prison but we transform their homes into a place of beauty, like a real photo shoot.

"It helps to reset the energy of their home for them while they're cooped up.

"You have to be really good at communicating with the subject, it takes a lot of direction.

"For one of the quarantine shoots we put the phone on the model's ceiling fan to get some great aerial shots.

"The model just needs a good phone or a camera and good internet service for it to work properly.

The rest is all styling, lighting and composition."  Pegg starts by creating a concept, then he guides the models through what fashion, hair styling and make-up they will need.

"I'm basically the creative director - we plan everything from the lighting and background to the earrings.

"They walk me through their home, roof etc and I figure out the best places to take the pictures while keeping them safe and socially distant.

"The models are serious about it, they make sure they have all the right clothing, jewelry, props and equipment to create the shoot.

"Then, as I normally would, I tell them how to pose to get the best shots.

"The composition is the most difficult, if they don't have a tripod or any photography equipment, which they usually don't, then we have to get creative with whatever they have around the house, plants and step ladders and stuff.

"I had one model put her phone on a cup to get the height and angle I wanted." While the shoots may be creative the photo quality of the screenshots is inferior to images taken with a professional camera.

"I've been charging lot less for these quarantine shoots because these images wouldn't work for a portfolio, but they are totally fine for social media," said Pegg."I'm just trying to stay creative, creative people can get depressed around this time, because they have a lot of idle time.

"These shoots give me the feeling of creating and accomplishing something, despite being on lockdown.

"It's cool when people message me to say they've been inspired by my shoots and I've been getting offers for new bookings too.

"It's a really different way of doing things but my clients have been really happy with the results so far." 

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