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Thursday, September 16, 2021

Analyst: 2023 JaxCo assessment might be worse than 2019

Credit: 41 Action News
Duration: 01:46s 0 shares 1 views

Analyst: 2023 JaxCo assessment might be worse than 2019
Analyst: 2023 JaxCo assessment might be worse than 2019

While Jackson County property assessments appear to favor taxpayers this year, a Kansas City-area data analyst said he's worried about 2023.

THANKS, CAITLIN.AS 2021 JACKSON COUNTYPROPERTY ASSESSMENTSGO OUT...SOME ARE ALREADYLOOKING AT THE NEXTASSESSMENT IN TWOYEARS.PROPERTY ASSESSMENTSARE A HOT TOPIC INJACKSON COUNTY --AS THE 2019 ASSESSMENTLED TO THOUSANDS OFAPPEALS.AND 41 ACTION NEWSREPORTER SARAH PLAKEEXPLAINS HOW THIS YEARCOULD HAVE AN IMPACT INTHE FUTURE.We talked to a data analystwho was critical of theprocess in 2019.

He says thisassessment looks to be in thefavor of the taxpayers..

But isworried for 2023.Preston Smith, WHO SERVESON THE JACKSON COUNTYBOARD OF EQUALIZATIONreceived the 2021 JacksonCounty property assessmentdata.He's comparing this year tothe mess that was 2019.What stood out was, one, wedidn't have the big increaseswe had two years ago.

Youonly have only 6/10ths of allthe parcels that were at 14.9percent, versus 28 percent ofthe parcels two years ago at14.9.From his analysis, mostpeople will receive a 0 to 5percent assessment increase.The county assessmentdirector Gail McCann Beattysaid her office wasconservative on purpose.but smith is worried aboutwhat he thinks could happenduring the next assessment itwo yearsSo they still didn't keep upwith market values, too low.So now to compensate twoyears from now they're goingto go the opposite way and goup even more to make up theground they didn't get now.The Kansas City RegionalAssociation of Realtors says ifthe assessments are fair andnot based on "driveby"appraisals..

They wont have amassive effect on the realestate market.Looking at real estate it's veryrarely a straight line, therearetypically peaks and valleys.

Iwould caution them to look atthat and say you know thismay be another peak whichmay be followed by anothervalley.Smith said he plans to furtheranalyze the data..

But for nowhe can't see any clearindication that any area oftown was hit harder thananot