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A self-confessed "unlikely athlete" becomes powerlifting champion in just one year

Video Credit: SWNS STUDIO - Duration: 01:36s - Published
A self-confessed 'unlikely athlete' becomes powerlifting champion in just one year

A self-confessed "unlikely athlete" becomes powerlifting champion in just one year

A self-confessed "unlikely athlete" has become a powerlifting world champion - just ONE YEAR after taking up the sport.Lucinda Perrett, 28, said she never felt sporty growing up especially during PE lessons at school when she was always the last to be picked for games.But when she started going to the gym she realised she loved working out - and proved a natural.She soon entered a local lifting competition and literally went from strength to strength - climaxing in four gold medals at the world championships in the summer.Impressively, she also won the British and European titles before heading to Florida, USA for the amateur event.International account manager Lucinda, from Tetbury, Glos., now trains as many as five times a week at her local gym.She can deadlift 170kg - nearly twice her body weight - and squat an impressive 152.5kg. She started powerlifting after moaning to friends about her strength - although struggled initially as her NAILS would break while flipping tyres.She said: "I went to the gym anyway but had some strong friends there - one just said that if I wanted to be better at working out I should be doing squats and bench presses."It's good for bone density so I was going to do it for health benefits anyway."But it turned out I was quite good at it.

It didn't take much work to get me lifting heavier weights."I am an unlikely athlete.

I was never sporty and was only picked because we didn't have enough people in our year."I was never particularly interested and I don't look like a typical athlete.

I'm the opposite of what you may picture an athlete to be."You look at someone like Jessica Ennis and she looks sporty.

People would probably look at me and be surprised to know that I train five times a week."But [powerlifting] has made me so much more body confident.

I am strong and my body is amazing."I'm not dedicated to the gym - I'm dedicated to bettering myself."Lucinda, who competes in the 90kg+ category, said now hopes to inspire other girls who might be suffering with body confidence issues.She said: "If there are girls thinking 'I'm rubbish at netball, or running' - they should know there's a place for everyone."There has been some girls in the gym who have asked me to show them how to deadlift or bench press."When I competed at the world championships, to know that other woman did this [powerlifting] was really good - I only train with men."I work from 9 'til 5:30 like everybody else but I go [to the gym] after work - it's my social life."I eat a lot of protein and I up my carbohydrates massively before a competition.

Meal preparation is key."Lucinda added that she is skipping next year's British Championships to "give someone else a go" - but has her sights set firmly on the European and World Championships.She competes as part of the Amateur World Powerlifting Congress (AWPC).Lucinda posts her progress on Instagram @lucindarp.

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A self-confessed "unlikely athlete" has become a powerlifting world champion - just ONE YEAR after taking up the sport.Lucinda Perrett, 28, said she never felt sporty growing up especially during PE lessons at school when she was always the last to be picked for games.But when she started going to the gym she realised she loved working out - and proved a natural.She soon entered a local lifting competition and literally went from strength to strength - climaxing in four gold medals at the world championships in the summer.Impressively, she also won the British and European titles before heading to Florida, USA for the amateur event.International account manager Lucinda, from Tetbury, Glos., now trains as many as five times a week at her local gym.She can deadlift 170kg - nearly twice her body weight - and squat an impressive 152.5kg.

She started powerlifting after moaning to friends about her strength - although struggled initially as her NAILS would break while flipping tyres.She said: "I went to the gym anyway but had some strong friends there - one just said that if I wanted to be better at working out I should be doing squats and bench presses."It's good for bone density so I was going to do it for health benefits anyway."But it turned out I was quite good at it.

It didn't take much work to get me lifting heavier weights."I am an unlikely athlete.

I was never sporty and was only picked because we didn't have enough people in our year."I was never particularly interested and I don't look like a typical athlete.

I'm the opposite of what you may picture an athlete to be."You look at someone like Jessica Ennis and she looks sporty.

People would probably look at me and be surprised to know that I train five times a week."But [powerlifting] has made me so much more body confident.

I am strong and my body is amazing."I'm not dedicated to the gym - I'm dedicated to bettering myself."Lucinda, who competes in the 90kg+ category, said now hopes to inspire other girls who might be suffering with body confidence issues.She said: "If there are girls thinking 'I'm rubbish at netball, or running' - they should know there's a place for everyone."There has been some girls in the gym who have asked me to show them how to deadlift or bench press."When I competed at the world championships, to know that other woman did this [powerlifting] was really good - I only train with men."I work from 9 'til 5:30 like everybody else but I go [to the gym] after work - it's my social life."I eat a lot of protein and I up my carbohydrates massively before a competition.

Meal preparation is key."Lucinda added that she is skipping next year's British Championships to "give someone else a go" - but has her sights set firmly on the European and World Championships.She competes as part of the Amateur World Powerlifting Congress (AWPC).Lucinda posts her progress on Instagram @lucindarp.





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