Global  

It's in their DNA: Nobel Prize in chemistry goes to pioneers of the CRISPR gene-editing tool

The Register Sunday, 18 October 2020 ()
0
shares
ShareTweetSavePostSend
 

You Might Like


Related videos from verified sources

The Woman Who Launched a Scientific Revolution | Walter Isaacson's The Code Breaker [Video]

The Woman Who Launched a Scientific Revolution | Walter Isaacson's The Code Breaker

Walter Isaacson — biographer of Steve Jobs, Leonardo da Vinci, Albert Eintein, and Ben Franklin — discusses the life and career of scientist Jennifer Doudna, cocreator or CRISPR and the 2020 winner..

Credit: Simon&Schuster     Duration: 05:36Published
Explainer: How the CRISPR/Cas9 Gene-Editing Tool Works [Video]

Explainer: How the CRISPR/Cas9 Gene-Editing Tool Works

STOCKHOLM — The 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry was awarded to two women who developed CRISPR/Cas9, a tool that allows scientists to cut parts of the genome like a pair of molecular..

Credit: TomoNews US     Duration: 01:18Published
CRISPR-Cas9 Tech Pioneer UC Berkeley Biochemist Jennifer Doudna Awarded Nobel Prize In Chemistry [Video]

CRISPR-Cas9 Tech Pioneer UC Berkeley Biochemist Jennifer Doudna Awarded Nobel Prize In Chemistry

Jennifer Doudna has become the latest UC Berkeley researcher to become a Nobel laureate. Doudna is part of the first all-female team to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her role in advancing gene..

Credit: CBS 5 SF KPIX     Duration: 02:34Published

Related news from verified sources

2 Woman Scientists Win Nobel Prize In Chemistry For Developing Genome Editing Tool

Two woman scientists have won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the development of one of gene technology's sharpest tools. Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A....
RTTNews

CRISPR creators, startup founders win Nobel Prize

The co-founders of several local startups and mothers of the scientific tool CRISPR received the scientific industry’s highest honor Wednesday: The Nobel...
bizjournals Also reported by •engadget

Nobel Prize in Chemistry Awarded to 2 Scientists for Work on Genome Editing

Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna developed the Crispr tool, which can change the DNA of animals, plants and microorganisms with high precision.
NYTimes.com


Tweets about this